Have You Made Your Christmas Pudding Yet??

I used to make Christmas fruitcake pretty much every year. But I must admit that I have never made plum pudding!

I really love to eat it – even if the rest of the family isn’t always keen. And I do have a bunch of dried fruit around the house. Maybe this will be the year that I attempt a plum pudding!

Please click through to Carol’s blog to check out her recipes for this yummy Christmas treat. And as usual, comments will be turned off here on 24 Carrot Diet. So please leave your comments on the original post. Thanks!

Retired? No one told me!

My oh, my is the time not flying now???

Time to make the puddings and mincemeat for Mince pies…

Christmas Pudding

This first recipe is gluten free..for all of my friends who have to eat gluten free for a diagnosed medical condition and it is delicious and quite frankly just as nice as my tried and tested recipe I always make..not much difference in taste.

So I am giving you both recipes one Gluten free and my tried and tested one which if you used gluten free breadcrumbs and flour would also be Gluten free..

Hopefully this year I will have proper rolls of wrapping paper as one’s son is in England and will be bringing some back for me…Yehhhh no juggling with those silly little rolls which are just enough to wrap a matchbox…I am not kidding!

 So here is the first recipe for a… Gluten FREE Christmas pudding… Enjoy!

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5 Fantastic Ways to Liven Up the Humble Turnip – Updated!

Turnip or Rutabaga?

It must be a Canadian thing. The vegetable that I grew up calling turnip is actually a rutabaga. This homely vegetable is thought to be a cross between a wild cabbage and a white turnip. Rutabaga is also known as swede, yellow turnip, or winter turnip. It is larger than a white turnip, and therefore easier to peel. It is good for long storage too, whereas your white turnips may not have the same staying power.

Both the white turnip and the yellow turnip belong to the brassica family, whose members are high in vitamins A, C and K, folic acid, and fibre. They also contain a surprising amount of protein, omega-3 fatty acids, and glucosinolate. You may know the brassicas as cruciferous vegetables, a name derived from the distinctive cross shape of their flowers.

 

What am I going to do with 20 lbs of yellow turnips?
The true turnip, otherwise known as summer turnip or white turnip (Image: Clagett Farm CSA at thebittenword.com/Flickr/CC BY 2.0)

How to Cook Turnips

Most folks are a bit hesitant to cook turnips because – well, they’ve never cooked with turnip! Some people do boil and mash them, but since many people find the taste sharp by itself it’s good to know a few other ways to introduce turnip into your diet.

  1. Eat turnip raw: Just cut it into small pieces and enjoy as is. Believe me, it’s good! Rutabaga is sweeter than you would expect, and it has a little bit of tang that is an interesting departure from other raw vegetables like carrot sticks.

You can also get a variety of turnip that is exceedingly tender and meant to be eaten raw. They are smooth, round, and white; they look a little like a button mushroom. Look for them at your farmers market or grocer’s produce section under the name “salad turnips.” They are also sometimes known as Hakurei or Tokyo turnips, and are a Japanese variety that mature early in the summer, like radishes. Slice them thinly and add to any green salad. They are really yummy with a balsamic vinaigrette!

If you can’t find salad turnips, try turning raw rutabaga or white turnips into turnip slaw. Shred the roots or cut them into julienne strips. If the taste is a bit odd at first, you can take a small amount and mix it in with your favourite coleslaw or broccoli slaw recipe. Or just add some shredded turnip to any green salad.

Recent nutrition studies favour eating our vegetables raw instead of cooked, so anytime you can eat turnips raw, don’t pass up the chance!

 

Hakurei, or salad, turnips are tender white roots that don’t need to be cooked
Salad turnips are sweeter than other turnips – and so tender you can cut them with a butter knife!
Graphic made in Canva using a public domain image by Pixabay user Hans

 

  1. Boil turnip: Cook up a batch of turnips and simply mash them with a little butter and salt. It’s heavenly, especially when made with the pretty yellow flesh of a rutabaga! You can also mash turnip with other root vegetables.

My mother-in-law used to make Scottish “tatties and neeps” in order to sneak the turnip into my husband’s diet when he was little. There is also rotmos, a Swedish puree traditionally made from turnip, carrot and potato. I like to leave out the potato, and just blend equal proportions of the carrot and turnip. It’s so sweet and delicious!

Other good matches for boiled turnip would be sweet potato, or even a little baked acorn or butternut squash. Flavour your mash with freshly grated ginger, some cinnamon, nutmeg or allspice, a little paprika or some thyme. Turnip goes well with chives, onion, or garlic too.

You don’t even have to mash the turnip after boiling it. Instead, try cutting it into julienne strips before cooking, and just serve your turnip julienne with a little butter or a honey-lemon glaze.

  1. Add turnip to soups and stews: I’ve always loved a good beef stew with turnip in it. But you can toss a bit of turnip into just about any soup or stew to boost its nutritional content, and bring a little zip to the flavour. If you like cream soups or chowders, add a bit of turnip to your favourite recipe and blend it until smooth. This is a great way to introduce turnips if you or your kids find the taste too strong. Increase the amount of turnip each time you make the soup, to help your taste buds adjust to the flavour.
  1. Bake or roast turnips: Cooking turnips in the oven is a snap. Just brush with a little olive oil and sea salt, and roast for about 30 minutes at 400ºF. You can also just slice a winter turnip into 1/2” pieces and tuck them under a chicken or turkey before cooking.

If you want to add turnip to a casserole with other foods, steam or boil it briefly first and then pat dry. This allows you to add turnips to recipes the otherwise wouldn’t give it the chance to cook all the way through.

Want to make healthy turnip fries? No problem! Cut your turnips into thick slices and boil them a bit to soften them up. Then coat them in oil and lay them on a sheet pan. Bake them at 425°F for about 20 minutes, or until crisp. Check out the video below if you want a fancier recipe for your turnip fries.

Roast turnip with other root vegetables like carrots or parsnips, or bake it with slices of butternut squash. If you like cheese, try sprinkling with a little Parmesan before serving.

  1. Make turnip noodles: If this idea sounds crazy to you, maybe you haven’t heard of spiralizing. Essentially, this cool new trend involves using a special spiral vegetable cutting gadget that slices your veggies into long thin ribbons – just like pasta noodles! The “noodles” are served with your favourite sauces instead of the less healthy, high carb pasta that puts a spare tire around our middles. Serving spiralized turnip is a great way to include this nutritious veggie in your diet. Eat them raw or cooked!

 

 

Did you find this post informative? If so, I hope you’ll share it with others who will be interested in learning more about turnips! Share this post by using the social media sharing buttons at left, or feel free to use the image below to pin it on Pinterest.

 

Cooking with Turnips | Fun new ways to cook turnips – and ideas for eating these healthy root vegetables raw too! | 24 Carrot Diet
Turnips and rutabagas are healthy cruciferous vegetables
Please Pin this article – remember sharing is caring!
Graphic made in Canva using a public domain image by Pixabay user Kovbaskina

 

Original content © 2016-2017 Kyla Matton Osborne, aka #RubyWriter
Last updated 04/09/2017

This article was published on my food blog, 24 Carrot Diet. If you are reading this content anywhere else, it has probably been stolen. Please report it to me so I can address any copyright infringements. Thank you!

Smorgasbord Health 2017 – Cook From Scratch with Sally and Carol – Asparagus

You all know that I absolutely love learning about the foods we eat. I want to know about their history and where they fit into our system of botanical classification. I want to understand the nutritional roles they play in our diet, and to discover how people prepared these foods in the past. And of course, I love to eat and to try great recipes for healthy foods that my family will want to eat.

Well, my family LOVES asparagus!

Now, it’s out of season here in southern BC at the moment. (Sadly! I wish we could enjoy it year round…) But this fabulous post by my friend Carol Taylor and her collaborator Sally Cronin just blew me away with its wealth of nutritional information and history on asparagus. And the recipes! There are several really great ways to cook asparagus that you’ll want to check out.

So please click through to Sally and Carol’s post. And please, if you have comments, leave them on the original post. Comments will be turned off at 24 Carrot Diet to help maintain the flow of conversation on the original post.

Note: The reblog link somehow ended up going to a truncated version of the post. To see the whole post, please click on the graphic below or follow the “see the post now” link. Thanks!

Smorgasbord Health 2017 – Cook From Scratch with Sally and Carol – Asparagus
SEE THE POST NOW | PIN FOR LATER

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Welcome to this week’s post where Carol Taylor and I combine forces and share not just the health benefits of foods but some recipes to showcase them in all their glory.

I appreciate that these posts are longer than the average but we hope that you feel that you are getting value for your time…My thanks to Carol for her hard work in the kitchen preparing these wonderful recipes.

HISTORY OF ASPARAGUS

Asparagus is a member of the lily family and the spears that we eat are shoots grown underground. The ancient Greeks used the word asparagus to describe any young tender shoots that were picked and eaten. It was cultivated over 2,000 years ago in that part of the Mediterranean and the Romans then picked up a liking for the delicacy eating fresh and dried out of season.

Source: Smorgasbord Health 2017 – Cook From Scratch with Sally and…

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